Tumblr accessibility culture fix: link text

michaelblume:

jadelennox:

Dear Tumblr users:

There’s a cultural thing on Tumblr that if people changed just a little, would be a big accessibility win. You know the technique of linking to the source of content with just a linked “X”, eg: [x], or numbers, eg 1, 2, and 3? Please don’t do this.

That tiny “X” makes a tiny, tiny target. It’s hard to see if you have vision impairments or other visual processing issues. It’s hard to navigate to with a mouse for users with mobility issues, and a nearly impossible target for many people with small touch screens. For screen reader users, it simply announces as “link: X” and can be very difficult to understand out of context. For people with cognitive processing issues, it’s a link that tells the user nothing about its destination.

And most of these limitations can also be problems for able-bodied people!

Instead, using meaningful link text. Some examples might be

For a video, the title of the video is a pretty good choice, eg “How Blind People Use Twitter & You Tube on the iPhone 4S”. Or “Source”, or “source at YouTube”, or “video source”.

It’s a little thing which can be hugely beneficial to people with disabilities. Thanks, and I hope you consider changing how you link.

(Please reblog, too!)

As is often the case, this will probably also make things nicer for your abled readers



A NSFW Post

realhousewivesofnightvale:

  • using malfunctioning equipment 
  • not wearing a hard-hat in the proper zones
  • leaving the coffee pot on
  • exposed wires 
  • not knowing the locations of the fire exits
  • blowtorch juggling 

(via waffletallest)


History Fans and Anti-Deathism

This post is about throwing together some ideas from the history fandom and the rationalist community to see what sticks.

For historians: Anti-deathism is the idea that death is bad, full stop. If we had the technology to let people live longer, or bring people back from the dead, we should do it. If we think it’s possible to invent that technology, it’s very important that we work on it, because death is really really bad. Death being “natural” doesn’t make it alright, or mean that we should submit to it. (Most anti-deathists don’t believe in an afterlife; some say death is bad because it means people not existing anymore.)

For anti-deathists: The history fandom is a thing. It’s a loose group of people who like history, and like talking about history online. I use the word “fandom” because “community” implies a smaller, tighter group. Some people like silly fanfic and gifsets, some like serious discussion. Most of the history fans I know like both. Some “history fans” are history students or professional historians, others read history as a hobby.

I’ve noticed that some people mourn historical figures as though they knew them personally, even though most of them died before they had the chance to meet them. Remembering them on the day that they died, getting very sad when someone mentions the person’s death, that sort of thing. (Please help me out if I’m describing this wrong; I mostly read anthropology-style history, where the subjects aren’t famous and specific people rarely get mentioned more than once, so I can’t quite relate.)

This makes me wonder if history fans have a different appreciation for death than people in general. They’re trying so hard to know someone across time and space, who they never had the chance to know because the person died too soon. This seems like a different sort of loss, than grieving someone you personally knew. Does feeling it change how you feel about death?


ozymandias271:

apology thoughts:

sometimes I don’t think I did anything wrong but I am still sorry because I hurt someone, either because of things I didn’t know about or because this was the best of a set of bad options

most apology scripts are like “I’m sorry, I will not do Thing in the future.”

but I will do Thing in the future probably if I’m in the same situation

that doesn’t mean I’m not sad that my actions hurt someone

is there a script for this situation or is the appropriate response not to apologize?

I have trouble with something that might be related; I say I’m sorry about something bad (and unrelated to my actions) that happened to someone else, and they think that means I feel guilty about it or think I caused it, when really I just regret that they’re having a bad time. I’d like to be able to communicate regret without it being mistaken for an apology, but I don’t know how to do that in English.

(I don’t speak any other languages fluently, but I can imagine there being languages where the two concepts aren’t so closely tied.)


I wonder if there’s any intersection/correlation between interest in history and anti-deathism. Should post more thoroughly on this later; too tired right now to explain what I mean.



The ghosts that vanished when the wicket closed. There was one among them, the appearance of a lady dressed in black, who was leaning in the embrasure of a window, and she had a light shining upon her golden hair, and she looked like…

A Tale of Two Cities

I just realized this is probably in reference to Lucie, or someone who looks like her? (Link goes to the chapter this is from; it’s at the end.)


hkirkh:

Why galaxies have spirals 

hkirkh:

Why galaxies have spirals 

(via waffletallest)



appendingfic:

ironcheflancaster:

wedonotpromoteviolence:

heirofspacecore:

sleek-black-wings:

thederpywingedone:

batmansymbol:

by the way did I ever tell y’all about the time I got a blank message from nobody, sent on new year’s eve in 1969, when the internet didn’t exist?
because that happened

What the fuck

Time travel.

Or maybe its from 2069, when we’ve developed the technology to send data to the past. You sent yourself a blank message as a test but as the email address you used to send it doesnt exist yet, it came up as no sender

I… what?

OKAY KIDS, LET’S LEARN ABOUT THE UNIX EPOCH
So back in the early days of computers, when we were trying to build clocks to keep all our computers in sync, we tried a bunch of different ways to synchronize them in ways that both normal people could use and programmers could utilize.
We just tried saying “The current time is THIS date” and just storing that date as some text, but while that was easy for humans, it was a bunch of different numbers that worked together in funny ways and computers don’t play nice with a bunch of random, arbitrary rules.
Not much worked, until we realized that we needed a BASELINE to compare against, and a way to represent the current time that covers everybody. So we came up with Unix time, because Unix was the style at the time. Essentially, Unix time represents any given time by saying “How many seconds ago was 12:00 AM on January 1, 1970 in Iceland somewhere?”. Recent enough to keep the numbers relatively small, far enough that nothing computer-y would fall before it, and consistent enough that there’d be no discrepancy based on where you are.
So what happens when you see the date “December 31, 1969” on a buggy message like this is that the computer received a bunch of zeroes by mistake and went “Oh, this must be a message!” Then when it tried to interpret it, it got to the date, found a zero, and said “Zero seconds since the Unix Epoch? I’ll round down - this was sent at the last second of New Year’s Eve, 1969! They’ll be so happy to finally get their blank message.”
And then the computer traipsed off on its merry way, because computers are fucking ridiculous.

This is frankly more hilarious than the 1969 time traveler theory

appendingfic:

ironcheflancaster:

wedonotpromoteviolence:

heirofspacecore:

sleek-black-wings:

thederpywingedone:

batmansymbol:

by the way did I ever tell y’all about the time I got a blank message from nobody, sent on new year’s eve in 1969, when the internet didn’t exist?

because that happened

What the fuck

Time travel.

Or maybe its from 2069, when we’ve developed the technology to send data to the past. You sent yourself a blank message as a test but as the email address you used to send it doesnt exist yet, it came up as no sender

I… what?

OKAY KIDS, LET’S LEARN ABOUT THE UNIX EPOCH

So back in the early days of computers, when we were trying to build clocks to keep all our computers in sync, we tried a bunch of different ways to synchronize them in ways that both normal people could use and programmers could utilize.

We just tried saying “The current time is THIS date” and just storing that date as some text, but while that was easy for humans, it was a bunch of different numbers that worked together in funny ways and computers don’t play nice with a bunch of random, arbitrary rules.

Not much worked, until we realized that we needed a BASELINE to compare against, and a way to represent the current time that covers everybody. So we came up with Unix time, because Unix was the style at the time. Essentially, Unix time represents any given time by saying “How many seconds ago was 12:00 AM on January 1, 1970 in Iceland somewhere?”. Recent enough to keep the numbers relatively small, far enough that nothing computer-y would fall before it, and consistent enough that there’d be no discrepancy based on where you are.

So what happens when you see the date “December 31, 1969” on a buggy message like this is that the computer received a bunch of zeroes by mistake and went “Oh, this must be a message!” Then when it tried to interpret it, it got to the date, found a zero, and said “Zero seconds since the Unix Epoch? I’ll round down - this was sent at the last second of New Year’s Eve, 1969! They’ll be so happy to finally get their blank message.”

And then the computer traipsed off on its merry way, because computers are fucking ridiculous.

This is frankly more hilarious than the 1969 time traveler theory

(via spoopsmcgee)


I just read my own writing out loud.

It was terrifying but I didn’t mess up too badly and people liked it and I got good feedback.


edwardspoonhands:

justthenewkid:

nuggetxnicole:

Kids React To: The sudden realization of their own mortality

even the baby’s a little shook up by the end

This small human has internalized the inexorable march of time far better than I have.

(via aurasama)


slatestarscratchpad:

nihilsupernum:

pantsagon:

The Sorting Hat of Harry Potter and Myers-Briggs Personality Typology
MB personality type and Jungian functions matched up with Hogwarts houses

nathanielbuildsatesseract
My primary function is…nickel? and my secondary function is…tellurium?
Aristotle can go home now, I’ve found my final cause and it is shiny grey-white metallic elements.

slatestarscratchpad:

nihilsupernum:

pantsagon:

The Sorting Hat of Harry Potter and Myers-Briggs Personality Typology

MB personality type and Jungian functions matched up with Hogwarts houses

nathanielbuildsatesseract

My primary function is…nickel? and my secondary function is…tellurium?

Aristotle can go home now, I’ve found my final cause and it is shiny grey-white metallic elements.


tastefullyoffensive:

The Adventures of George Washington (Part 2) by LadyHistory [more]

Previously: Part One

(via spoopsmcgee)